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profiler jun 22, 2016

articles/reviews


In his Q&A appearance on Monday night, Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull revealed a profound ignorance of his government’s mishandling of arts funding when quizzed by singer Katie Noonan. He insisted that the Australia Council has been better funded under the Abbott-Turnbull Government, that most Catalyst Funding went to regional arts (37% in fact) and used Geelong’s Back to Back Theatre (he clearly didn't know who they were) as an example of a regional company that might not otherwise have been funded had it not been assisted by Catalyst. Browse Catalyst funding results and you’ll see familiar names of organisations usually funded by the Australia Council, some now additionally advantaged, while some larger players have taken the opportunity to source funds that were once the province of the small to medium sector which now faces a bleak future. Former Arts Minister George Brandis envisaged a broader and more competitive funding model; instead, he and his successor have catalysed an aberration: brutal, chaotic and divisive. Make your vote count, but not for an out of touch, uncaring Turnbull. Keith & Virginia

MURDER, MEMORY, ART
MURDER, MEMORY, ART

In Campbelltown Arts Centre’s Secrecy and Despatch, 30 works, constellating around an 1816 massacre west of Sydney, powerfully reflect on violence inflicted on Indigenous peoples in Australia and Canada.

JACK SARGEANT
JACK SARGEANT

The inimitable Program Director of the idiosyncratic REVELATION Perth International Film Festival guides us through a 2016 program rich in features, documentaries, shorts and surprises.

THE ARTIST AS STRIPPER
THE ARTIST AS STRIPPER

As Melanie Jame Wolf enacts and reflects on her lap-dancing career in Mira Fuchs, Varia Karipoff decides that in this case too much information is just enough.

ANNIHILATING MELANCHOLIA
ANNIHILATING MELANCHOLIA

At the Lorne Sculpture Biennale earlier this year, prize-winning essayist Stephen Wright encountered a site-specific performance that resonated like “a low-tech outtake from Bowie’s Blackstar.”

A NEW MUSIC FORCE
A NEW MUSIC FORCE

Works from the 70s and 80s by Roger Smalley performed by Decibel confirm the late composer’s adventurousness and the strength of his legacy, writes Alex Turley.

SPECULATIVE DANCE
SPECULATIVE DANCE

In Dancenorth’s If_Was_, though working from shared materials, choreographers Ross McCormack and Stephanie Lake create radically different visions of human struggle, adaptability and potential.

MYSTERIES & DISORIENTATIONS
MYSTERIES & DISORIENTATIONS

Greg Hooper finds himself engrossed in the brilliance of the hi- and lo-fi blend of South Korean video artist Taeyoon Kim’s video works at Brisbane’s MAAP Space.

GIVE!
GIVE!

Australia, step up in Fallujah humanitarian crisis! “Australia’s investment in aid in Iraq is just a few per cent of the hundreds of millions of dollars we spent on our military intervention.” Donate now. (Image: Civilians flee Fallujah in Iraq, June 2016, AFP)

Previous e-ditions

realtime 133 june-july 2016

Realtime 133 Cover

contents

cover


realtimedance : RealTime's new portal to Australian dance opens our extensive dance archive back to 1994, profiles 12 leading Australian choreographers, features dance on screen and Realtime onsite at dance events.

dance highlights


gideon obarzanek: after glow
keith gallasch, chunky move’s gideon obarzanek, rt81
garry stewart: dance evolution in the age of robotics
erin brannigan, adt's devolution, rt71
lucy guerin: between temperature & temperament
jonathan marshall, rt52
rosalind crisp: a european future
erin brannigan, rt48
helen herbertson: the place where things slip
philipa rothfield, delirium, rt36
tess de quincey & stuart lynch: dancing the city
keith gallasch, compression 100, de quincey lynch, rt11

Cover (detail): AAAAAAAAH! still (Steve Oram as Smith)